SoloBSD

Dec 032018
 

There is a new build of SoloBSD 11.2-STABLE-1203 based on the latest HardenedBSD stable branch version v1100056.9.

Changelog v1100056.9

Packages:

  • cpdup
  • dmidecode
  • e2fsprogs
  • ipmitool
  • nano
  • rsync
  • smartmontools
  • tmux
  • htop
  • mksh
  • ksh93
  • oksh
  • Python2.7

Now with heal-harddrive.sh script included from Martin Sugioarto. Check Instructions of use.

WARNING:

Be aware that running it on a drive containing a filesystem will DESTROY data, metadata and perhaps even the entire filesystem.
MAKE SURE YOU HAVE BACKUPS!

You can grab it from Here (ISO) (184 Mb) or Here (img) (221 Mb)

root password: solobsd

Nov 172018
 

There is a new build of SoloBSD 11.2-STABLE-1117 based on the latest HardenedBSD stable branch version v1100056.8.

Changelog v1100056.8

Packages:

  • cpdup
  • dmidecode
  • e2fsprogs
  • ipmitool
  • nano
  • rsync
  • smartmontools
  • tmux
  • htop
  • mksh
  • ksh93
  • oksh
  • Python2.7

Now with heal-harddrive.sh script included from Martin Sugioarto. Check Instructions of use.

WARNING:

Be aware that running it on a drive containing a filesystem will DESTROY data, metadata and perhaps even the entire filesystem.
MAKE SURE YOU HAVE BACKUPS!

You can grab it from Here (ISO) (182.3 Mb) or Here (img) (219 Mb)

root password: solobsd

Oct 282018
 

There is a new build of SoloBSD 11.2-STABLE-1028 based on the latest HardenedBSD stable branch version v1100056.7.

Changelog v1100056.7

Packages:

  • cpdup
  • dmidecode
  • e2fsprogs
  • ipmitool
  • nano
  • rsync
  • smartmontools
  • tmux
  • htop
  • mksh
  • ksh93
  • oksh

Now with heal-harddrive.sh script included from Martin Sugioarto. Check Instructions of use.

WARNING:

Be aware that running it on a drive containing a filesystem will DESTROY data, metadata and perhaps even the entire filesystem.
MAKE SURE YOU HAVE BACKUPS!

You can grab it from Here (ISO) (182.1 Mb) or Here (img) (219 Mb)

root password: solobsd

Oct 132018
 

Ok, since I am reading Michael Lucas’ FreeBSD Mastery: Storage Essentials I decided to get my hands dirty and learn about GELI and disk encryption. Here are my notes:

First of all, you need a new device to encrypt, you can encrypt existing devices, but you need to backup data first. I assume too that you have GELI up and running.

  • Randomizing the device.
          We want our device to be filled by randomness, so we apply three teaspoons of it:
           dd if=/dev/random of=/dev/ada0p1 bs=1m

I went the easy way and encrypted without a key file, this is NOT RECOMMENDED, so create your key file. (You can find how in the book 🙂 )

  • Initializing the provider.
           geli init -s 4096 /dev/ada1p1

You will receive the next message:

Metadata backup can be found in /var/backups/ad1p1.eli and can be restored with the following command:

geli restore /var/backups/ada1p1.eli /dev/ada1p1
  • Activate the device.
geli attach /dev/ada1p1

Ok now you have your device ready, let’s create a new filesystem on it and mount it:

newfs -j /dev/ada1p1.eli
 mount /dev/ada1p1.eli /mnt/

Done? Ok now unmount and detach it.

umount /mnt
 geli detach ada1p1.eli

Groovy!